Heartworm Preventative Effectiveness Study

Rumors about dogs that have been on monthly heartworm prevention all year round but have still contracted heartworm disease have been circulating for years. These cases are very difficult to confirm, however, because it is next to impossible to determine whether or not a dog truly received and absorbed its heartworm prevention on an appropriate schedule, particularly since the lapse in question would have occurred quite a while before heartworm positive results. It takes five or six months for the juvenile heartworms passed through the bite of an infected mosquito to mature into the adults that are responsible for a positive heartworm test and most clinical signs of heartworm disease.

An Alarming Study

Now, scientific evidence that supports the presence of resistance to certain preventatives in some populations of heartworms in the United States is starting to accumulate. In one study, researchers infected forty dogs with heartworm larvae from a strain called MP3 that were originally collected in Georgia and are known to be somewhat resistant to some types of heartworm preventative. Infected dogs were divided into five groups and treated in the following manner 30 days later:

  • Group 1: oral ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate (Heartgard Plus)
  • Group 2: oral milbemycin oxime (Interceptor)
  • Group 3: topical selamectin (Revolution)
  • Group 4: topical imidacloprid/moxidectin (Advantage Multi)
  • Group 5: untreated

All treated dogs were given the label dosage of their respective medications based on their weight.

The Results

When the dogs were examined for adult heartworm approximately five months after being infected with heartworms the researchers determined that 100% of the untreated dogs and 87.5% of dogs in groups 1, 2, and 3 were heartworm positive. Dogs in the untreated group had anywhere between 34 and 70 worms in their hearts and lungs. Heartgard Plus, Interceptor, and Revolution did prevent many of the larvae from developing into adult (dogs typically had only between 2 and 3 worms in their hearts and lungs) but only Advantage Multi was completely effective at killing the MP3 strain of heartworm larvae.

What This Means for Pet Owners

It is important to remember that the VAST majority of dogs and cats that develop heartworm disease do so because they did not receive a preventative heartworm medication every month all year round regardless of type. Nevertheless, owners should be aware that in some parts of the United States, certain populations of heartworms appear to be developing resistance to particular preventatives. If you live in the Southeast or Central regions of the United States, talk to your veterinarian about whether switching to Advantage Multi might be in your pet’s best interest.


Blagburn BL, Dillon AR, Arther R, et al. Comparative efficacy of four commercially available heartworm preventive products against the MP3 laboratory strain of Dirofilaria immitis. Vet Parasitol. 2011 Mar 10; 176(2-3):189-94. Epub 2011 Jan 1.


All About Albon

Albon (sulfadimethoxine) is a sulfa drug – a type of antibiotic that has been around for a very long time.  But, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t still an incredibly powerful and useful tool in veterinary medicine.  Albon can be used to treat infections throughout the body caused by a wide variety of susceptible microorganisms.

When you hear the term “antibiotic,” you probably think of medications that treat bacterial infections.  While Albon and its relatives can certainly do this, they are also effective against a particular type of parasite called CoccidiaCoccidia infect the gastrointestinal tract, usually causing diarrhea in puppies, kittens, and other young animals.

When using Albon, veterinarians typically prescribe an initial “loading dose” that is twice that of subsequent doses.  This allows the drug to quickly reach therapeutic levels in the body.  A pet’s condition should noticeably improve within 48-72 hours of beginning treatment.  If this does not occur, contact your veterinarian.  Make sure to give your pet all of the doses of Albon that were prescribed, even if he or she seems completely back to normal.  Treatment should continue for at least 48 hours after all symptoms have resolved.

Albon comes in both pill and liquid form available from vetdepot.com, which makes accurately dosing animals of all sizes easy.

How to Safely Switch your Dog’s Pain Medication

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) are a cornerstone in the treatment of canine pain. They can be used in cases of acute injury (i.e. trauma or post-operatively) and also for chronic conditions like osteoarthritis.  Many different prescription NSAIDs have been developed specifically for dogs.  These pet medications are much more effective and safer for canine use than are over-the-counter human medications like aspirin.

With so many choices, owners often wonder which NSAID is best for their dog. There is no one right answer to this question.  Some dogs respond better to one product versus another, but there is no way to determine which is best without trying several.  If your veterinarian prescribes a particular type of NSAID and your dog does well on it, there is no reason to make a change.  However, if you are not pleased with your dog’s response to one brand, you should try one or two more before coming to the conclusion that NSAIDs won’t work for your dog.

However, switching between types of canine NSAIDs can be dangerous when done incorrectly. To lower the risk of unwanted side-effects like gastrointestinal ulcers, the first drug needs to be eliminated from the body before the second drug is introduced.  This process can take around five days to be complete, so you should wait at least this long after stopping one type of NSAID before starting another and watch your dog closely for signs of gastrointestinal distress like vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite when starting the new drug.

If your dog requires pain-relief during the five day wash-out period, your veterinarian can prescribe an analgesic that is not an NSAID, like Tramadol.

Purchasing Pet Medications Online

It is human nature to search out the least expensive and simplest way to make a purchase.  That’s why internet shopping has become so popular, right? Purchasing discount pet meds online is a fantastic way for pet owners to save money.  But the old saying “if it seems too good to be true, it probably is” certainly can apply.  Let’s see how.

Some common pet medications are available without a prescription.  This is true for popular brands of flea and tick control, most nutritional supplements, dental care options, some forms of arthritis relief, and more.  In these cases, owners can purchase directly from the pharmacy without first contacting their veterinarian.  However, you should always tell your vet about any medication, prescription or not, that your pet is taking.

Prescription medications are another story.  Because of potential dangers to pet or human health if these medications are used incorrectly, a veterinarian must be involved BEFORE they are dispensed.  Common prescription pet medications include antibiotics, heartworm preventatives, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories.  If you ever run across an online pet pharmacy that offers to sell you a prescription medication without a prescription, run!  This is not a reputable company, and they are very likely cutting other corners that could endanger your pet’s health.

Obtaining a prescription and having it forwarded to an online pet pharmacy may seem inconvenient, but it is a simple way to make sure that your pet is getting the care and high quality medications that he or she deserves. Many online pet pharmacies, like VetDepot, make it easy for you to get the medication you need by contacting your veterinarian via fax, phone or email to obtain a prescription for your order. If your veterinarian chooses to provide you with the written prescription required for your order, you can fax, mail or scan and email your prescription to the pharmacy to fill your order. If you ever have any questions or require assistance, a reputable online pet pharmacy will have helpful customer support staff to help you.


New Survey Shows How Far Owners Will Go for Their Pets

A new survey done by the Kroger Company shows that about one in ten dog or cat owners would be willing to spend more than $3,000 on medical procedures if it meant that their pet’s life could be saved, and some pet owners would spend even more.  The majority of those polled (61%) said they would be willing to spend between $100 and $1,000 under the same circumstances.

The survey also asked owners what they fear most with regards to their pet’s well-being.  The top responses were:


1. Cancer (27%)

2. Hip/Knee/Leg Injury (17%)

3. Getting hit by a car (16%)


1. Kidney Disease (19%)

2.) Cancer (17%)

3.) Injuries sustained in fights with other animals (10%)

Owners were also polled about their interest in pet insurance, which can cover accidents, illnesses, routine care and pet medications.  61% of dog owners and 48% of cat owners said they would consider purchasing pet insurance if it costs under $20 a month, and at least half of pet owners said they would be interested in adding their pets to their own health insurance plans if such a thing were possible.