Tips on Saving Big Bucks on your Furry Little Friend

Responsible pet ownership requires an investment that lasts the lifetime of your pet. In this regard, owning a pet is similar to caring for a child. There are many ongoing costs associated with caring for your dog or cat, but there are easy things you can do to help keep some of these costs down.

Shop Around for Vets: When you’re choosing a vet, call several local veterinary offices and ask them the cost for a routine exam. Often, vets will use this price as a base price for all other procedures. Vets who charge less for a routine exam tend to have lower prices overall. Don’t wait for an emergency to choose your veterinarian; you will be more stressed in emergency situations and may not be as concerned with cutting costs.

Compare Prices Online for your Pet’s Medications: If you buy your flea preventatives and other pet medications at your veterinarian’s office, you are likely being charged a mark-up of over 100% of the wholesale price. Shopping online for your pet’s medication can lead to huge savings, plus the added convenience of receiving your pet’s medications delivered to your door. When you’re comparing prices online, you can often save money by ordering more doses in one time. Make sure you order discount pet medications only from secure sites based in the US that are certified by either LegitScript or Vet-VIPPS like vetdepot.

Don’t Let Fido Eat You out of House and Home: No matter what, your furry friend is always going to want to eat! The biggest ongoing cost pet owners pay is food. Many pet foods labeled as “Premium” or other special diets cost more than double what other pet foods cost. Be aware that there is no legal standard pet foods must meet to be labeled as “Premium”, but any food that is labeled “complete & balanced” or “total nutrition” meets the minimum legal standard required for pet foods. Unless your pet has a medical condition requiring a special diet, you probably don’t need to spend extra on pricey foods that may offer no extra benefit to your pet’s health.

Invest in Preventative Care: You’ve probably heard the old saying that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Keeping up with your pet’s routine exams and vaccinations can prevent a wide variety of serious and costly health problems. Clean choppers also make a big difference in your pet’s health. Brushing your dog or cat’s teeth and feeding them dental treats can help prevent periodontal disease, a common cause of kidney and lung problems. Finally, make sure your pet maintains a healthy weight. Have plenty of playtime and don’t overfeed your furball. Obesity can cause diabetes and arthritis, among other expensive problems. Remember, a healthy pet is a happy pet, and a healthy pet costs you less!

Protect Your Pets From Fleas, Ticks, and Mosquitoes

Ticks, fleas, mosquitoes and all other pests are out in full force and this can put your pet at an increased health risk.  The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) says pet owners should take special care to protect their pets from ticks, fleas and mosquitoes this season. You can find products to protect your pets at vetdepot.  Dogs, cats and other pets are especially susceptible to health risks posed by such pests.

Some health risks include the transmission of heartworms to pets via Mosquitoes which can result in heart disease, ticks can cause diseases such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever by spreading bacteria to pets.  In addition, the saliva from fleas can cause anemia, dermatitis and the transfer of tapeworms to pets.  Fleas often jump onto pets when outdoors and enter into homes where they can multiply and quickly infest bedding, furniture and clothing.

It is important to always inspect pet coats thoroughly after spending time outdoors.  Here are a few recommended tips from the NPMA to keep your pet safe from pests:

  • Watch for excessive scratching or licking on your pet
  • Avoid walking pets in tall grass, pests love to gather here
  • Wash pet bedding, plush toys and vacuum frequently
  • Talk to your veterinarian about treatment options to protect your pet, and seek medical advice if ticks or fleas are found on your pet