SprayShield Animal Deterrent Spray Stops Aggressive Dogs

Responsible dog owners do whatever they can to make sure their canine companion isn’t involved in a scuffle with another dog. However, you never know when you might encounter an off-leash dog when out on a walk, which might lead to an unforeseen dangerous situation for your pooch. SprayShield animal deterrent spray is a great thing for pet parents to carry on walks to ward off an aggressive dog or stop an incident that’s escalating into a dog fight.

SprayShield available from online retailer vetdepot, contains a powerful citronella formula that is not harmful to the eyes, making it a safe and humane way to stop an attacking dog. Even when walking or jogging without your canine companion, SprayShield is a good thing to have on hand in case of an encounter with an aggressive dog on the loose.

SprayShield is easy to use- just shake for one to two seconds, slide the trigger to the right, aim at the animal’s nose and spray. The spray can reach up to 10 feet.

Popular and Unique Names for Pets

Are you looking for inspiration to name a dog, cat, or other new pet?  Check out VPI’s top 10 lists for the most popular pet names based on their records.

Dogs Cats Birds and Exotics
1. Bella 1. Bella 1. Charlie
2. Bailey 2. Max 2. Max
3. Max 3. Chloe 3. Baby
4. Lucy 4. Oliver 4. Sunny
5. Molly 5. Lucy 5. Buddy
6. Buddy 6. Shadow 6. Jack
7. Daisy 7. Smokey 7. Angel
8. Maggie 8. Tiger 8. Daisy
9. Charlie 9. Charlie 9. Bella
10. Sophie 10. Tigger 10. Coco


Want something a little more unusual?  VPI also puts together lists of the wackiest pet names, including notables such as Stinkie Mcstinkerson, Beagle Lugosi, Beanfart, Oxxy Pawsbourne, Mittens Ninja, and Bobblehead.

The hard work of pet ownership doesn’t stop once you have a name picked out.  You also have to make sure you have all the pet supplies and resources on hand that you will need to keep your pet happy and healthy in its new home.

Top 10 Pet Toxins

Pets can get into a variety of dangers lurking around your home. Everyday items like gum, medications or flea control could potentially be fatal if ingested by your pet. The Pet Poison Hotline has put together lists of the Top 10 pet toxins for both dogs and cats.  If you think that your pet has gotten into one of these potential poisons or any toxic substance, call your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Hotline at 1-800-213-6680.

Top 10 Dog Poisons

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect      bait stations
  3. Rodenticides      (i.e. mouse and rat poison)
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol-containing      products (i.e. sugar-free gums and candies)
  6. Ibuprofen      (Advil® or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)
  7. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  8. Silica      gel packs
  9. Amphetamines,      such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household      cleaners

Top 10 Cat Poisons

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine      pyrethroid insecticides (topical flea and tick medicine designed for dogs      but erroneously placed on cats)
  3. Household      cleaners
  4. Rodenticides
  5. Paints      and varnishes
  6. Veterinary      non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (Rimadyl®, Deramaxx®)
  7. Glow      sticks/glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines      (such as ADD/ADHD drugs)
  9. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  10. Ibuprofen      (Advil or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)



How to Safely Switch your Dog’s Pain Medication

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) are a cornerstone in the treatment of canine pain. They can be used in cases of acute injury (i.e. trauma or post-operatively) and also for chronic conditions like osteoarthritis.  Many different prescription NSAIDs have been developed specifically for dogs.  These pet medications are much more effective and safer for canine use than are over-the-counter human medications like aspirin.

With so many choices, owners often wonder which NSAID is best for their dog. There is no one right answer to this question.  Some dogs respond better to one product versus another, but there is no way to determine which is best without trying several.  If your veterinarian prescribes a particular type of NSAID and your dog does well on it, there is no reason to make a change.  However, if you are not pleased with your dog’s response to one brand, you should try one or two more before coming to the conclusion that NSAIDs won’t work for your dog.

However, switching between types of canine NSAIDs can be dangerous when done incorrectly. To lower the risk of unwanted side-effects like gastrointestinal ulcers, the first drug needs to be eliminated from the body before the second drug is introduced.  This process can take around five days to be complete, so you should wait at least this long after stopping one type of NSAID before starting another and watch your dog closely for signs of gastrointestinal distress like vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite when starting the new drug.

If your dog requires pain-relief during the five day wash-out period, your veterinarian can prescribe an analgesic that is not an NSAID, like Tramadol.

How to Treat Canine Hot Spots

As summer months bring heat and extreme temperatures, it is important to be mindful of ailments that can affect our furry friends. Hot spots can be both painful and unpleasant for dogs; however, with quick and attentive at home care from owners, recovery is a few steps away. In order to provide the proper treatment owners must be mindful and attentive to their pet’s behavior as well as employ proper preventative measures to avoid occurrence and reoccurrence of hot spots. If hot spots do emerge, pet owners can employ a variety of at home treatments from vetdepot to ease pain and discomfort.

Hot spots are usually seen in long haired breeds of dogs as moisture that is trapped close to the skin creates bacteria akin to dermatitis as seen in their human counterparts. Observing one’s pet during the summer month for excessive itching and the emergence of red spots or sores is important to identifying canine hot spots. If your pet is scratching the same spot repeatedly, experiences pain to the touch, or has a spot that is red and irritated or releases pus, then hot spots are most likely the culprit.

If you have a long-haired dog, you might consider a short summer haircut. Regular brushing and baths can keep mats and tangles at bay, which are often the contributing cause of hot spots in long haired dogs. Allergies can also affect hot spots so be mindful of your pet’s exposure to certain outdoor plants.

If hot spots appear, proper care is necessary. First, clip all of the hair in the area surrounding the hot spot. Next, carefully wash the wound with a gentle antibacterial soap and let dry completely to avoid more exposure to moisture. Depending on the severity and quantity of hot spots, you may consider visiting your vet for some cortisone or a topical antibiotic for dogs. Medicated anti-itch powders can also provide comfort for your four legged friend.

It’s important to be mindful of the cause of your pet’s hot spots, whether it be a grooming issue or an allergic reaction. Knowing the cause can help prevent reoccurrence and make the rest of your summer itch free for your lovable pet!