Popular and Unique Names for Pets

Are you looking for inspiration to name a dog, cat, or other new pet?  Check out VPI’s top 10 lists for the most popular pet names based on their records.

Dogs Cats Birds and Exotics
1. Bella 1. Bella 1. Charlie
2. Bailey 2. Max 2. Max
3. Max 3. Chloe 3. Baby
4. Lucy 4. Oliver 4. Sunny
5. Molly 5. Lucy 5. Buddy
6. Buddy 6. Shadow 6. Jack
7. Daisy 7. Smokey 7. Angel
8. Maggie 8. Tiger 8. Daisy
9. Charlie 9. Charlie 9. Bella
10. Sophie 10. Tigger 10. Coco

 

Want something a little more unusual?  VPI also puts together lists of the wackiest pet names, including notables such as Stinkie Mcstinkerson, Beagle Lugosi, Beanfart, Oxxy Pawsbourne, Mittens Ninja, and Bobblehead.

The hard work of pet ownership doesn’t stop once you have a name picked out.  You also have to make sure you have all the pet supplies and resources on hand that you will need to keep your pet happy and healthy in its new home.

Top 10 Pet Toxins

Pets can get into a variety of dangers lurking around your home. Everyday items like gum, medications or flea control could potentially be fatal if ingested by your pet. The Pet Poison Hotline has put together lists of the Top 10 pet toxins for both dogs and cats.  If you think that your pet has gotten into one of these potential poisons or any toxic substance, call your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Hotline at 1-800-213-6680.

Top 10 Dog Poisons

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect      bait stations
  3. Rodenticides      (i.e. mouse and rat poison)
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol-containing      products (i.e. sugar-free gums and candies)
  6. Ibuprofen      (Advil® or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)
  7. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  8. Silica      gel packs
  9. Amphetamines,      such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household      cleaners

Top 10 Cat Poisons

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine      pyrethroid insecticides (topical flea and tick medicine designed for dogs      but erroneously placed on cats)
  3. Household      cleaners
  4. Rodenticides
  5. Paints      and varnishes
  6. Veterinary      non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (Rimadyl®, Deramaxx®)
  7. Glow      sticks/glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines      (such as ADD/ADHD drugs)
  9. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  10. Ibuprofen      (Advil or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)

 

 

Pain Relief for Cats

Cats are physiologically different than dogs.  Because of this, they are more prone to developing potentially life threatening side-effects from the most common class of pain relievers used in dogs –NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatories). This makes keeping cats comfortable in the face of both acute (i.e. post-surgical or traumatic injury) and chronic (i.e. osteoarthritis) pain challenging.

When cats are hospitalized, veterinarians have a wide range of options to choose from regarding pain medication. But once a cat is scheduled to go home, the choices become more limited.  Below are a few of the more commonly used pain relievers for cats commonly available from retailers like http://www.vetdepot.com.  Many are also good options for dogs.

  • Buprenorphine – good  for acute and chronic pain but can get expensive with long-term use
  • Tramadol  – good  for acute and chronic pain
  • gabapentin – good for chronic pain
  • amantadine – good for chronic pain
  • Joint Supplements – good for chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis and possibly some other conditions
  • Metacam (meloxicam) – this is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory that has been used in cats, but repeated use increases the risk of side effects.  It may still be an option for some individuals.

If you think your pet is in pain, talk to your veterinarian and ask if any of the aforementioned pet medications might be appropriate.

 

Is Pet Insurance Right for You?

More owners are looking into and purchasing health insurance for their pets.  Choices range from very inexpensive policies that provide some financial help when dealing with an unforeseen illness or accident to more comprehensive plans that cover preventative care and have high coverage limits.  Of course these latter policies also have higher premiums, but with a little research most pet owners can find a pet insurance plan is a good fit for them.

Here are a few things to remember when considering health insurance for your pet:

  • No policy covers all your veterinary expenses.  You will still need to have savings and/or credit available to cover deductibles, copays, and costs that exceed or are excluded from your policy.  Primarily think of insurance as a way to help deal with unexpected expenses.  Routine purchases like vaccines, heartworm prevention and flea and tick control can be budgeted for and purchased from online retailers such as vetdepot.com.
  • Know what you are buying.  All policies have exclusions, so check the fine print.
  • Preexisting conditions will not be covered, so if your dog or cat has already been diagnosed with a disease, the cost of treating it (pet medication refills, rechecks, etc.) will come out of your pocket.  Consider getting insurance when your pet is young to avoid the pitfalls associated with preexisting conditions.

Tips on Saving Big Bucks on your Furry Little Friend

Responsible pet ownership requires an investment that lasts the lifetime of your pet. In this regard, owning a pet is similar to caring for a child. There are many ongoing costs associated with caring for your dog or cat, but there are easy things you can do to help keep some of these costs down.

Shop Around for Vets: When you’re choosing a vet, call several local veterinary offices and ask them the cost for a routine exam. Often, vets will use this price as a base price for all other procedures. Vets who charge less for a routine exam tend to have lower prices overall. Don’t wait for an emergency to choose your veterinarian; you will be more stressed in emergency situations and may not be as concerned with cutting costs.

Compare Prices Online for your Pet’s Medications: If you buy your flea preventatives and other pet medications at your veterinarian’s office, you are likely being charged a mark-up of over 100% of the wholesale price. Shopping online for your pet’s medication can lead to huge savings, plus the added convenience of receiving your pet’s medications delivered to your door. When you’re comparing prices online, you can often save money by ordering more doses in one time. Make sure you order discount pet medications only from secure sites based in the US that are certified by either LegitScript or Vet-VIPPS like vetdepot.

Don’t Let Fido Eat You out of House and Home: No matter what, your furry friend is always going to want to eat! The biggest ongoing cost pet owners pay is food. Many pet foods labeled as “Premium” or other special diets cost more than double what other pet foods cost. Be aware that there is no legal standard pet foods must meet to be labeled as “Premium”, but any food that is labeled “complete & balanced” or “total nutrition” meets the minimum legal standard required for pet foods. Unless your pet has a medical condition requiring a special diet, you probably don’t need to spend extra on pricey foods that may offer no extra benefit to your pet’s health.

Invest in Preventative Care: You’ve probably heard the old saying that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Keeping up with your pet’s routine exams and vaccinations can prevent a wide variety of serious and costly health problems. Clean choppers also make a big difference in your pet’s health. Brushing your dog or cat’s teeth and feeding them dental treats can help prevent periodontal disease, a common cause of kidney and lung problems. Finally, make sure your pet maintains a healthy weight. Have plenty of playtime and don’t overfeed your furball. Obesity can cause diabetes and arthritis, among other expensive problems. Remember, a healthy pet is a happy pet, and a healthy pet costs you less!