SprayShield Animal Deterrent Spray Stops Aggressive Dogs

Responsible dog owners do whatever they can to make sure their canine companion isn’t involved in a scuffle with another dog. However, you never know when you might encounter an off-leash dog when out on a walk, which might lead to an unforeseen dangerous situation for your pooch. SprayShield animal deterrent spray is a great thing for pet parents to carry on walks to ward off an aggressive dog or stop an incident that’s escalating into a dog fight.

SprayShield available from online retailer vetdepot, contains a powerful citronella formula that is not harmful to the eyes, making it a safe and humane way to stop an attacking dog. Even when walking or jogging without your canine companion, SprayShield is a good thing to have on hand in case of an encounter with an aggressive dog on the loose.

SprayShield is easy to use- just shake for one to two seconds, slide the trigger to the right, aim at the animal’s nose and spray. The spray can reach up to 10 feet.

Top 10 Pet Toxins

Pets can get into a variety of dangers lurking around your home. Everyday items like gum, medications or flea control could potentially be fatal if ingested by your pet. The Pet Poison Hotline has put together lists of the Top 10 pet toxins for both dogs and cats.  If you think that your pet has gotten into one of these potential poisons or any toxic substance, call your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Hotline at 1-800-213-6680.

Top 10 Dog Poisons

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect      bait stations
  3. Rodenticides      (i.e. mouse and rat poison)
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol-containing      products (i.e. sugar-free gums and candies)
  6. Ibuprofen      (Advil® or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)
  7. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  8. Silica      gel packs
  9. Amphetamines,      such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household      cleaners

Top 10 Cat Poisons

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine      pyrethroid insecticides (topical flea and tick medicine designed for dogs      but erroneously placed on cats)
  3. Household      cleaners
  4. Rodenticides
  5. Paints      and varnishes
  6. Veterinary      non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (Rimadyl®, Deramaxx®)
  7. Glow      sticks/glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines      (such as ADD/ADHD drugs)
  9. Acetaminophen      (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  10. Ibuprofen      (Advil or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)



How to Safely Switch your Dog’s Pain Medication

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) are a cornerstone in the treatment of canine pain. They can be used in cases of acute injury (i.e. trauma or post-operatively) and also for chronic conditions like osteoarthritis.  Many different prescription NSAIDs have been developed specifically for dogs.  These pet medications are much more effective and safer for canine use than are over-the-counter human medications like aspirin.

With so many choices, owners often wonder which NSAID is best for their dog. There is no one right answer to this question.  Some dogs respond better to one product versus another, but there is no way to determine which is best without trying several.  If your veterinarian prescribes a particular type of NSAID and your dog does well on it, there is no reason to make a change.  However, if you are not pleased with your dog’s response to one brand, you should try one or two more before coming to the conclusion that NSAIDs won’t work for your dog.

However, switching between types of canine NSAIDs can be dangerous when done incorrectly. To lower the risk of unwanted side-effects like gastrointestinal ulcers, the first drug needs to be eliminated from the body before the second drug is introduced.  This process can take around five days to be complete, so you should wait at least this long after stopping one type of NSAID before starting another and watch your dog closely for signs of gastrointestinal distress like vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and loss of appetite when starting the new drug.

If your dog requires pain-relief during the five day wash-out period, your veterinarian can prescribe an analgesic that is not an NSAID, like Tramadol.

Purchasing Pet Medications Online

It is human nature to search out the least expensive and simplest way to make a purchase.  That’s why internet shopping has become so popular, right? Purchasing discount pet meds online is a fantastic way for pet owners to save money.  But the old saying “if it seems too good to be true, it probably is” certainly can apply.  Let’s see how.

Some common pet medications are available without a prescription.  This is true for popular brands of flea and tick control, most nutritional supplements, dental care options, some forms of arthritis relief, and more.  In these cases, owners can purchase directly from the pharmacy without first contacting their veterinarian.  However, you should always tell your vet about any medication, prescription or not, that your pet is taking.

Prescription medications are another story.  Because of potential dangers to pet or human health if these medications are used incorrectly, a veterinarian must be involved BEFORE they are dispensed.  Common prescription pet medications include antibiotics, heartworm preventatives, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories.  If you ever run across an online pet pharmacy that offers to sell you a prescription medication without a prescription, run!  This is not a reputable company, and they are very likely cutting other corners that could endanger your pet’s health.

Obtaining a prescription and having it forwarded to an online pet pharmacy may seem inconvenient, but it is a simple way to make sure that your pet is getting the care and high quality medications that he or she deserves. Many online pet pharmacies, like VetDepot, make it easy for you to get the medication you need by contacting your veterinarian via fax, phone or email to obtain a prescription for your order. If your veterinarian chooses to provide you with the written prescription required for your order, you can fax, mail or scan and email your prescription to the pharmacy to fill your order. If you ever have any questions or require assistance, a reputable online pet pharmacy will have helpful customer support staff to help you.


The Danger of Transporting Pets

Bringing a new dog or cat into your home is a time of discovery and joy; that is unless the discovery centers on pet illness.

In the past, most pets were obtained from local sources (i.e. nearby shelters or breeders) and therefore tended to only have diseases that were common to the area.  These days, however, some breeders will send their puppies or kittens hundreds or thousands of miles to their new owners or to pet shops.  Animals in shelters may also have traveled great distances.  This is especially true in parts of the country, like the Northeast, that have managed to gain better control of the animal over-population problem.  Animals are now often transported from facilities that are overflowing to those that have available space in another part of the country.

While this is obviously beneficial for the animals that would otherwise have been euthanized, it can occasionally present some problems for their new owners.  If your new pet becomes sick, it is now quite possible that the illness may be something that your local veterinarian does not see on a regular basis.

So, what can owners do to protect their new pets?  Try to find out your pet’s travel history and pass it along to your veterinarian.  This information can be a life-saver by helping your vet determine whether any screening tests should be run. Background info is also extremely helpful in producing a quick diagnosis so that the appropriate treatment and pet medications can be administered in the unfortunate event that your pet does fall ill.