Kroger Co. Pet Food Recall

Kroger Co. has recalled certain packages of pet food due to a possible contamination of Aflatoxin.  Aflatoxin is a poisonous byproduct from the growth of fungus on common crops such as corn. Aflaxtoxin poisoning can cause liver damage and can be lethal. Symptoms of poisoning due to Aflatoxin include lethargy, loss of appetite, discoloration of eyes or gums, and diarrhea.  If your pet is experiencing these symptoms, contact their veterinarian immediately.

According to the FDA, the Kroger grocery store chain is recalling the following pet foods:

•Pet Pride Cat Food sold in 3.5 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111088128.

•Pet Pride Cat Food sold in 18 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111071357.

•Pet Pride Tasty Blend Poultry & Seafood Cat Food sold in 3.5 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111088152.

•Pet Pride Tasty Blend Poultry & Seafood Cat Food sold in 18 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111074580.

•Pet Pride Kitten Formula Food sold in 3.5 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111071903.

•Old Yeller Chunk Dog Food sold in 22 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111074566.

•Old Yeller Chunk Dog Food sold in 50 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111074563.

•Kroger Value Cat Food sold in 3 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111000018.

•Kroger Value Chunk Dog Food sold in 15 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code: 1111071559.

•Kroger Value Chunk Dog Food sold in 50 lb. packages with a sell by date of OCT 23 11 DP and OCT 24 11 DP under the following UPC code:1111000108.

Affected Kroger stores include those locations in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. For a full list of stores and pet foods affected by the recall, visit http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm237459.htm

Holiday Gifts for your Furry Family Members

Christmas is just around the corner and a new poll indicates that many canine and feline family members are likely to find something under the tree this year. The Associated Press recently conducted a poll that reported that approximately 53% of pet owners are planning to purchase something for their animals this holiday season. Spoiling your pet rotten over the holidays with the latest fashionable doggy sweater or crystal encrusted collar is certainly enjoyable, but purchasing a more beneficial gift this holiday is also something to consider.

Treats and toys are a great way to spoil and reward your pup this holiday season, but some have more benefits than others when it comes to the health of your pet. Retailers like vetdepot have a wide selection of products for your pet. There are a lot of treats available that are both tasty and contribute to the health of your pet’s teeth, coat, joints, or overall health. Greenies dental treats or CET Chews are both great choices for giving the gift of clean teeth and a yummy snack to your pet.

It’s also the time of year to remember those that are less fortunate, including our four-legged friends. Be thankful for the lovable companion you have and maybe give the gift of a small donation to a local animal shelter to help those furry creatures not lucky enough to have a loving family. Pet food, blankets, or monetary donations are almost always warmly welcomed at most shelters.

Happy Holidays to you and your pet!

Does Your Pet Dream?

Many people have long believed that their pets dream. Twitching noses and wiggling paws are often taken as evidence of deep sleep adventures. While it is currently impossible to know for sure if Fido is chasing one hundred mailmen or if Fluffy is dreaming of opening the world’s largest can of tuna, recent research indicates that your pet does indeed dream.

Like you, your pet’s dreams often include things they experienced during the day. Matthew Wilson and Kenway Louie, scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, recently did a study on the brains of sleeping rats. During the day, they ran the rats through mazes and recorded their brain activity. They found that while the rats slept, their brains engaged in the same patterns. The brain activity patterns were so specific that the researchers were even able to identify particular areas of the maze in the rats’ dreams. These findings suggest that animals dream in much the same way that people do.

When you see your four-legged friend dreaming, don’t wake them! Our pets need deep sleep time to stay in good health. Normally, little jerks and twitches during sleep are incredibly adorable and not a cause for concern. However, if you notice your pet’s movements becoming exaggerated like they are having a seizure or if they appear to be in pain, you may want to videotape their sleep and show it to your veterinarian. Make sure your pet eats right and gets plenty of exercise and their sleep cycles should be absolutely purrfect. Most likely, they will be having sweet dreams about their wonderful day with you!

Rub-a-Dub, Cats in the Tub

The best part about giving your cat a bath is that you don’t have to do it often. Most cats are not big fans of getting even small sprinkles of water on their fur, so bath time tends to involve splashing, scratching, plenty of mewing and sometimes a bit of resentment until kitty dries off.  You may not find your feline friend lounging in the tub any time soon, but you can take a few simple steps to make bath time a little more pleasant for kitty and for you.

Pull on a pair of rubber gloves because even the sweetest cat is likely to claw and scratch when bath time rolls around. Next, get some gentle pet shampoo. Cats don’t like strong scents on their fur and they don’t like getting shampoo in their eyes any more than you do. Don’t try to dunk kitty in the tub! Instead, fill the sink with about 3 inches of warm water. Gently wet your cat from his shoulders to his tail, lather him up and rinse him off. If necessary, clean his face with a washcloth. After the bath, wrap your cat in a large towel (bonus points if you warm the towel in the dryer!) and try to get as much water off of him as possible. Try using blow-dryer on a low setting if you have a long-haired cat who isn’t too frightened of the noise.

Luckily, most of the time cats are self-cleaning creatures. From time to time, your cat may soil himself in a litter box accident or need a flea-bath, but thankfully these incidents are few and far between. Kitty’s best friend will probably never be rubber ducky, but at least now you know you can make bath time a little less difficult. Do you have any tips to make bath time easier for you and your cat? Please feel free to share in the comments!